Category Archives for "Superannuation"

12 common myths – Employee or contractor?

There are several myths and assumptions by both workers and employers when it comes to trying to decide whether or not someone is a contractor or an employee.

Here are 12 common myths that often get both businesses and workers into hot water.

  1. Having an Australian business number (ABN)

Myth: If a worker has an ABN they are a contractor.

Fact: Just because a worker has an ABN does not mean they will be a contractor for every job. Whether the worker has or quotes an ABN makes no difference and will not change the worker into a contractor. To determine whether a worker is an employee or contractor, you need to look at the whole working arrangement and examine the specific terms and conditions under which the work is performed.

  1. Common industry practice

Myth: “Everyone in my industry takes on workers as contractors, so my business should too.”

Fact: Just because “everyone” in an industry uses contractors does not mean they’re correct. Don’t use “common industry practice” to make determinations.

  1. Short-term work

Myth: Employees cannot be used for short jobs or to get extra work done during busy periods.

Fact: The length of a job (short or long duration) or regularity of work makes no difference to whether a worker is an employee or contractor. Both employees and contractors can be used for:

  • casual, temporary, on call and infrequent work
  • busy periods
  • short jobs, specific tasks and projects.

To determine whether a worker is an employee or contractor, you need to look at the whole working arrangement and examine the specific terms and conditions under which the work is performed.

  1. The 80% rule

Myth: A worker cannot work more than 80% of their time for one business if they want to be considered a contractor.

Fact: The 80% rule, or 80/20 rule as it is sometimes called, relates to personal services income (PSI) and how a contractor:

  • reports their income in their own tax return
  • determines if they can claim some business-like deductions.

It is not a factor a business should consider when they determine whether a worker is an employee or contractor.

  1. Past use of contractors

Myth: “My business has always used contractors, so we do not need to check whether new workers are employees or contractors.”

Fact: Before engaging a new worker (and entering into any agreement or contract), a business should always check whether the worker is an employee or contractor by examining the working arrangement. Unless a working arrangement (including the specific terms and conditions under which the work is performed) are identical to previous arrangements, it could change the outcome of whether the worker is an employee or contractor.

Sometimes a business may also have incorrectly determined their worker is a contractor. Continuing to rely on the original “contractor” decision would mean the business is incorrectly treating all future workers as contractors when they are employees.

  1. Registered business name

Myth: If a worker has a registered business name, they are a contractor.

Fact: Having a registered business name makes no difference to whether a worker should be an employee or contractor for a particular job. Just because a worker has registered their business name does not mean they will be a contractor for every job or working arrangement.

  1. Contracting on different jobs

Myth: If a worker is a contractor for one job, they will be a contractor for all jobs.

Fact: If a worker is a contractor for one job, it does not guarantee they will be a contractor for every job. The working arrangement and specific terms and conditions under which the work is performed will determine whether a worker is an employee or contractor for each job.

Depending on the working arrangement, a worker could be an:

  • employee for one job and a contractor for the next job
  • employee and a contractor if completing two jobs at the same time for different businesses.
  1. Paying super

Myth: “My business should only take on contractors so we do not have to worry about super.”

Fact: A business always needs to look at the working arrangement and examine the specific terms and conditions under which the work is performed to determine whether a worker is an employee or contractor. A business cannot decide to treat a worker as a contractor when they are an employee.

Additionally, businesses may be required to pay super for their contractors. If you pay an individual contractor under a contract that is wholly or principally for the labour of the person, you have to pay super contributions for them.

  1. Specialist skills or qualifications

Myth: Workers used for their specialist skills or qualifications should be engaged as contractors.

Fact: If a business takes on a worker for their specialist skills or qualifications it does not automatically mean they are a contractor. A worker with specialist skills or qualifications can either be an employee or contractor depending on the terms and conditions under which the work is performed. Qualifications or the level of skill a worker has (including whether they are “blue” or “white” collar) makes no difference to whether a worker is an employee or contractor.

  1. Worker wants to be a contractor

Myth: “My worker wants to be a contractor, so my business should take them on as a contractor.”

Fact: Just because a worker has a preference to work as a contractor does not mean your business should engage them as such. Whether a worker is an employee or contractor is not a matter of choice, but depends entirely on the working arrangement and the specific terms and conditions under which the work is done.

If you give into pressure and agree to treat an employee as a contractor, you can face penalties, interest and charges for not meeting your tax and super obligations.

  1. Using invoices

Myth: “If a worker submits an invoice for their work, they are a contractor.”

Fact: Submitting an invoice for work done or being “paid on invoice” does not automatically make a worker a contractor.

To determine whether a worker is an employee or contractor, you need to look at the whole working arrangement and examine the specific terms and conditions under which the work is performed. If based on the working arrangement a worker is an employee, submitting an invoice or being paid on the basis of an invoice will not change the worker into a contractor.

  1. Contracts

Myth: “If a worker’s contract has a section that says they are a contractor, then legally they are a contractor.”

Fact: If a worker is legally an employee, a contract saying the worker is a contractor will not make the worker a contractor at law. Businesses and workers will sometimes include specific words in a written contract to say that the working arrangement is contracting in the mistaken belief that this will make the worker (who is an employee) a contractor at law.

If a worker is legally an employee, a contract specifying the worker is a contractor makes no difference and will not:

    • override the employment relationship or change the worker into a contractor
    • change the PAYG withholding and super obligations a business is required to meet

 

I know it’s confusing but if you are unsure the ATO has a fabulous tool which can be found here which can help you and best of all you can rely on the result.

SuperStream is here…..are you ready?

The government wants to improve the superannuation system and bring it into the modern electronic world through the introduction of SuperStream, and this includes for SMSFs.

Under the new system, employers must interact electronically using approved software. Employers with 20 or more employees should have already started using SuperStream from July 1 last year, but smaller employers (those with 19 or fewer employees) have until July 1, 2015 to start to comply. Small business owners need to get their skates on to be ready in time.One relatively easy option for small employers is to use the Small Business Superannuation Clearing House to do all your superannuation for you. This online government service is already SuperStream ready, so small employers can save themselves the hassle of implementing SuperStream.

The Tax Office has set out a nine-step process to help small employers. You are not required to follow all nine steps, but it helps get your head around what needs to be done.

Step 1: Assess your options

Find the solution that suits you best. Potential solutions identified by the Tax Office include:

  • if you have a payroll system, you should look for updated or new SuperStream-compliant products coming on to the market
  • if you rely on external partners, check what they are planning to do and scan the market for emerging products or opportunities
  • speak to your payroll software provider or clearing house about their SuperStream plans
  • if you are outsourcing, speak to your payroll or accounting services provider
  • if you rely on your default super fund for assistance with contributions, you should speak to them.

Step 2: Set a target start date

You must begin implementing SuperStream from July 1, 2015 onwards, but the Tax Office will provide flexibility for you on your start date, provided you are doing your best to implement and have a firm plan to do so by June 30, 2016.

Step 3: Collect new information

There is some new data you need to collect. Some relates to all funds, some to APRA funds (retail and industry funds) and some only apply to SMSFs. You need to collect:

 

Information required Type of fund
Fund ABN All funds (including SMSFs)
Unique superannuation identifier (USI) APRA funds (not SMSFs)
Bank account details SMSFs only
Electronic service address SMSFs only
Employee TFN All funds (including SMSFs)

 

The APRA funds will provide employers with their USI, but if not contact APRA for the information.

For existing employees, where you are paying contributions to their SMSF, your employees will need to supply the information specific to their fund. This includes the SMSF’s bank account details and their electronic service address.

Step 4: Update your payroll records

Once you’ve collected the new information, you’ll need to update your payroll records.

Step 5: Upgrade your payroll system

If you use payroll software, your software provider will be able to tell you whether an upgrade is required and, if so, when it intends to release a SuperStream-compliant version of their product.

Step 6: Connect to your provider

Depending on the solution you choose, you may need to arrange connections and security log-in credentials with your service provider or default super fund.

Step 7: Undertake a trial

Once you have done the above your service provider may provide an opportunity to test your solution.

Step 8: Make your first SuperStream contribution

You will need to:

  • run a trial payroll balance for your contributions with a subtotal for each fund
  • process your payments and generate a unique reference number associated with each payment
  • copy these reference numbers and add them back into your contribution files before you send the files as data messages.

Step 9: Refine your process

Review your process and determine if you need to make changes.  Also keep abreast of any developments in SuperStream. You need not follow all nine steps or the order suggested by the Tax Office, but it is a useful checklist.